Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades

Summary

In the preceding essays I have laid out in detail all of my philosophical views. I will now go over them again more quickly in a high-level summary:

Work to Philosophy

Per my pragmatist metaphilosophy, all practical endeavors have at least a distant instrumental use for philosophy, in that all practical work can be analyzed in terms of using some tool to do some job, where:

  • Tools are:
    • Administered by technologists, and
    • Created by engineers, best informed by the discoveries of the
    • Physical sciences, which in turn best employ the products of the
    • Philosophy of reality and knowledge
  • Jobs are:
    • Administered by businesspeople, and
    • Created by entrepreneurs, best informed by the discoveries of the
    • Ethical sciences, which in turn best employ the products of the
    • Philosophy of morality and justice

The job of philosophy is thus to seek wisdom, meaning a way of discerning better from worse answers to questions about both reality and morality, giving the physical and ethical sciences the tools they need to do their jobs of enabling the creation of further tools and jobs with which to drive all manner of practical work.

Per my essay on practical action, the possibility of success at any endeavor requires trying, but assuming either that success is impossible or that it is guaranteed means that there is no reason to try, and so renders success impossible. We must therefore always act according to a tacit assumption that success is possible, but not guaranteed.

Commensurablism

Doing philosophy successfully thus requires that we assume what I call commensurablism, or objective criticism, which is the position that, to questions about both reality and morality:

  • It is possible to achieve such wisdom, in other words it is possible for some proposed answer to be genuinely correct, a position that I term "objectivism"; and
  • Such wisdom is not guaranteed, in other words no proposed answer is ever definitively correct beyond all question, a position that I term "criticism".

Criticism, being the commitment to always being open to critically questioning anything, is the negation of what I term "fideism", which in turn encompasses:

  • Appeals to authority
  • Appeals to popularity
  • Appeals to intuition

Objectivism, being the commitment to there being objective answers to all meaningful questions, is the negation of what I term "nihilism", which in turn encompasses:

  • Particular senses of relativism
  • Particular senses of idealism
  • Solipsism or egotism

Criticism demands appealing always to experiential phenomena to judge proposed answers to questions without appeals to faith, a position I term "phenomenalism"; equivalently, rejecting fideism demands also rejecting what I term "transcendentalism", which in turn encompasses:

  • Supernaturalism and the ethical analogue thereof, and
  • Particular senses of materialism

Objectivism demands always allowing the initial possibility that some proposed answer might be the correct one rather than rejecting every proposal at the outset, a position I term "liberalism"; equivalently, rejecting nihilism demands also rejecting what I term "cynicism", which in turn encompasses:

  • Justificationism, and
  • Conflation of descriptive claims with prescriptive claims

Commensurablism, or objective criticism, thus demands phenomenal liberalism, which is to say the rejection of both transcendentalism and cynicism. That in turn demands a philosophy of meaning that:

  • Differentiates between descriptive and prescriptive propositions (so as not to fall into cynicism), and
  • Grounds both types of proposition in different experiential phenomena (so as not to fall into transcendentalism)

Phenomenal objectivism, which is to say the rejection of both transcendentalism and nihilism, demands: Action

  • A philosophy of mathematics that:
    • Grants some kind of objective existence to abstract objects, but
    • Does not locate them in some kind of transcendental realm
  • A philosophy of art that:
    • Grants that things can be objectively beautiful, but
    • Does not ascribe any kind of transcendental quality to such beauty
  • An empirical realist ontology
  • A hedonic moralist teleology
  • A functional panpsychist philosophy of mind, and
  • A functional compatibilist philosophy of will

Critical liberalism, the rejection of both fideism and cynicism, demands:

  • A critical rationalist or falsificationist epistemology,
    • which demands a freethinking philosophy of academics,
      • which in turn depends upon an enlightened academic community;
    and
  • A liberal or libertarian deontology,
    • which demands an anarchic philosophy of politics,
      • which in turn depends upon an empowered political community.

Having read through my philosophy in detail once, and again reading through this high-level summary, I recommend reading this entire Codex through once more in detail with this bigger picture in mind, to better see how each smaller piece fits together into the unified whole that I hope you now understand.


Back to the Introduction.